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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face discussions. it's always better to be talking than not. the other development is that increasingly congressional republicans recognize that the position that they had staked out is unsustainable. >> one of the arguments we hear from some democrats is that the fiscal cliff isn't really a cliff, it's more like a slope and you could gradually go down it and the withholding from tax wouldn't kick in for a while and the spending cuts wouldn't hurt the economy for a while. do you think it is good idea to go over the deliver and it is more of a slope. >> no, i think would be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could
if we don't deal with the deficit right away. the fiscal cliff is a very different story. that's about reducing the deficit too fast. >> ifill: you call it an austerity bomb. describe what you mean by that. >> what's happening is that we are scheduled, unless something is done basically to do to ourselves gratuitously what has been happening to some of the european economies. we're going to have substantial spending cuts, substantial tax increases at a time when the dme is still very weak. of course that's a recipe for sliding back into recession. we set ourselves up with the land mine and the road in front of our economy which is not based on anything real, it's just based on our politicalness. >> ifill: speaking of political mess, both sides have what they say are opening gambits on the table. president obama at least his last week which calls for $1.6 trillion in revenues. the republicans came back with their own yesterday. as you looked at each approach, what do you see in that? >> well, i think it's important. i think the reporting has been a little weak on the republican plan. it
in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal.
will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do you want it to be in the next five years? >> i think, charlie, what we've tried to do is simplify the portfolio into infrastructure and financial services. we like where the portfolio is today. we think in the infrastructure space there's going to be roughly $4 trillion spent each year, so it's an attractive big market. globally is where our opportunities are so the company's -- probably a decade ago 30% of our revenues were outside the united states. now it's more like 60% or 65%. so we think we've got the portfolio we want. we've dramatically increased the amount of technology. and in the end i think technology and innovation are the competitive advantage. we've got a good global footprint. we're in 140 countries. and we'
. but limiting or even charitable deductions could be part of a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. one man of the tax policy center says given our national debt? sort of tax hikes are inevitable. >> one way is to tax the same income we have right now but get more revenue. the alternative is to tax more. get rid of the deductions and the exemptions, the things that reduce or taxable income. we tax more at today's rates and we bring in more revenue. >> reporter: itemized deductions are the first form of tax breaks on the table. used by 30% of tax payers they cost the government over $200 billion a year. about a fifth of this year's deficit. charitable donations alone cost $40 billion a year. but ending them is costly too. >> anybody who gives money away, taxes will go up. they'll pay more. that's what we're all about trying to get rid of these. but at the same time they'll likely give less to charity. if i don't get the deduction, it's going to cost me more after taxes to give away money. >> reporter: and say nonprofit leaders, if the rich stop giving, the poor stop getting. >> we're here to
cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america
and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house makers haven't nailed this down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling for the debt limit, i think we'll be back in recession. it will be a fairly severe recession. so policy makers have a few weeks but not much more than that. they have to get this together. >> susie: some people are saying that today's jobs report is very encouraging and that you can look at this as a way that maybe the economy can handle some stuff belt tightening because things are looking a little bit bett
. >> this gets to being able to walk and chew gum at the same time, being able to deal with the fiscal cliff but also potential chemical weapon crises in syria. if the whitehouse wasn't concerned the president wouldn't have gone out and delivered that speech earlier this week. >> rose: finally there's this thing that he has to continue with. he's got a new administration coming up in january. we're now in december. who is handling that transition, who is setting up the process of selecting a new secretary of state, a new secretary of defense, a new chief of staff, a new head of the cia? >> so peat rauss is a deputy chief of staff senior advisers, he's playing a central role on all of this. based on our reporting it look like what the president is going to do is first announce his security team and that could come as early as next week so he would be announcing at the same time secretary of state, defense secretary, cia among the names. it's not super news but state senator john kerry, un ambassador susan rice. i asked the president whether or not he felt the republican criticisms and attack
year. >> to avoid the fiscal cliff, we will be cut between the week between christmas and new years. >> we go over the cliff and get a deal right after new years. >> mort? >> the economy is going to be very weak despite the solution on the fiscal cliff. >> ryan is right on the cliff, by the way. i predict the captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> an unprecedented surrender. the oakland police department gives up authority to a court appointed director. is it enough to avoid a federal takeover? california schools are poised for a tidal wave of money, nearly $3 billion over 5 years. to make schools greener. a bleak future for african-american school-aged boys. it's one of several alarming findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. their hope is that those will end with a deal between congress and the president and that will make way for a steady improvement in the economy. those are the things that they will monitor to see when is the time that they can ease back. >> sreenivasan: greg ip from the "economist," thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> sreenivasan: wall street initially rallied on the fed's pronouncement, but the enthusiasm quickly flagged and stocks gave up the gains. in the end, the dow jones industrial average lost three points to close at 13,245. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3,013. indianapolis will be the first major american city to replace all city-owned cars with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. the program announced today calls for completing the switch by 2025. the city also plans to phase in fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas. officials said they're asking auto makers to create plug-in hybrid police cars, which don't yet exist. retiring u.s. senator joe lieberman said goodbye to the sen
that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> sreenivasan: the president has insisted there will be no deal unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the top 2%. republicans say the tax hikes would only hurt job creation. but in arlington, virginia, vice president biden said today's jobs report shows the economy is turning a corner, so it's critical to get a deal. >> there is a sense... there is a sense that if we can reach an- - act like adults and reach an agreement here on the fiscal cliff, the upside is much higher even than the downside is if we don't. >> sreenivasan: biden said the president is willing to consider what he called any serious offer. aides for the two sides were expected to continue talking, through the weekend. wall street was mostly higher on the news from november's jobs report. the dow jones industrial average gained 81 points to close at 13,155. the nasdaq was hurt by another sell-off in apple stock, and fell 11 points to close at 2,978. for the week, the dow gained 1%. the nasdaq lost 1%. this
to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is under 20%. why what a the president back down? >> the president isn't interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding a fiscal cliff, and clearly not been tested at all in cutting and spending. >> the senate minority leader says that what the president is interested in is getting as much taxpayer money has he can so that he can spend to his heart's content. with his approval ratings going up and congress' numbers at historic lows and the unemployment rate dropping, why with the president back down? charles? >> to some extent he is under estimating the damage she will suffer if -- he suffer if we go over the cliff. it will hurt the republicans in congress, which is why democrats will relish going over the cliff. but oba
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)